Posts Tagged ‘Rock’

When I grow up, I wanna be like David Corio.

April 27, 2010

Event: CONVERSE and Jam Division presents Youth/Decay: Iconic Rock & Roll Photography Exhibition
Date: April 24, 2010 (Saturday) – May 5, 2010 (Wednesday)
Venue: Zinc Art Space, Bangsar

I am hopeless when it comes to music instruments. I was naturally enrolled for piano lessons after my sister when I was 5, only to quit the moment I finally got myself to Grade 8. Better half of my high school days was spent on the school band, only to pay more attention with complicated formations, and to convince apathetic juniors to stay focus and not quit, instead of working on my flute. I also distinctively remember my flute solo being matter-of-factly given to another better player in an orchestra performance years ago. And I never learned to play the guitar, only air guitar – with my left hand.

What are we musically challenged bunch left but our abundant CD collection, a good ear to sift out the good from the bad, and a good eye, to perhaps someday capture moments like these captured by one of the best music photographers out there – David Corio.

After the hype from the exhibition launch the previous night had died down, what was left were the few photography fans, armed with their own DSLRs, with ears on attentively to hear Corio share his stories with famous musicians, while sauntering about the gallery, hoping to take good shots of Corio’s best shots without looking too much of a fool.

I know I felt that way. So, do forgive me if the photos in this entry look weird or amateur (if they aren’t already in general); I did feel intimidated just being in the same room with his photos, let alone being in the same room with him.

The better part of the crowd has left when I arrived later that day. Which was a good thing, since I do not really like crowds. The spacious art gallery left ample space for patrons to move around without obstructing the view of others checking out the photos on display.

To set the mood, drifting in and out from the background was the distinguishable voice of Kelly Jones, only all too appropriate for two reasons: that Stereophonics will be stopping by Malaysia themselves in a few days. And that it is an iconic rock & roll photo exhibition – someday, perhaps, in one of the photos Kelly Jones will sport his leather jacket and Ray Ban shades as he rocked out his solo in Superman. Click. Frozen in time.

With every photo displayed on the wall, Corio told a story behind it. How they were taken, when they were taken. A picture of Eric Clapton actually smiling and letting loose backstage before a gig. An overlapped expose of The Cure, done accidentally, purposely, in a concert setting much too inconvenient for any photographer. A closeup shot of Deborah Harry he took, while the other photographers moved further behind for theirs, and even got a cuffing in the head himself for not following suit.

One of Tom Waits by his piano, too grainy but too perfect to be thrown away. One of Michael Jackson, taken for that split second when he took off his sunglasses and looked back at the flashing cameras – almost scared. That one frozen frame of Bob Marley with his dreadlocks flung in the air like a spider’s legs.

All 36 photos on display during the exhibition are for sale. Some of them cost RM1,800, most of them RM2,000. The thought of looking at some 20 photos that costs as much as the camera I hold in my hands each. Wow.

I noted a few favourites while I was browsing. Two of which were the ones above of Bob Marley and Joe Strummer.

Another is this of AC/DC. I just love photos of musicians and their guitars.

And this of Nick Cave and his long-time collaborator Mick Harvey.

So. Birthday presents for me, anyone? I’d love you forever. Heh.

A plus for showing up that Saturday was that David Corio was there too. He hung back after having a one-hour talk on photography and his works, doing interviews, perhaps even autographs and taking pictures with people.

I even managed to get him to pose with the famous U2 photo he did, which also made the cover of their U218 Singles compilation album, before striking up the courage to shake his hand and introduce myself. Quite a well-mannered guy, with a notable gap between his bucked teeth and talking British with a sort of lisp. I have never been one to come up impromptu conversations. Only managed a lame: “It’s nice to meet you. Your photos are really great.” Meh.

If you are a fan of old rock & roll music, or love photography, or just like to purchase expensive photos out of spite, I would suggest you to stop by this photo exhibition. It is not everyday someone like Corio, who has rubbed shoulders with famous musicians we have only been listening to on the radio, stop by. If you don’t get to meet him in person, it’s still quite a nice trip to Zinc on a weekend.

Someday.

++
Zinc Art Space

Lot 61 Jalan Maarof (opposite Dataran Maybank)
59000 Bangsar
Kuala Lumpur
Malaysia
T: +6 03 2282 5388
F: +6 03 2284 8044
W: http://www.zinc.com.my

Youth/Decay: An Iconic Rock & Roll Photography Exhibition
Exhibition date: Apr 24 – May 5, 2010
Business hour: 12PM-6PM; closed on Sunday
Admission: Free

PS: Also, if you are a fan of music photography, might I suggest checking out those by the late Jim Marshall. This is my favourite of Keith Richards. RIP.

MTV World Stage : Interview with Raygun

August 25, 2009
Tell us a bit about your band, Raygun.
Raygun is made up of me, Ray, the lead, along with guitarist The Adj, bassist Ben and drummer Sam. Adj and I have been a band of sorts for six years now since we were studying in London College of Music. Ben and Sam joined in later and the chemistry was right. Then, as everyone says, the rest is history.
What kind of music of you guys play?
We play a lot of 70s rock. Our influences are those such as David Bowie, T-Rex, Mick Jagger and Iggy Pop, so our music will mostly be inspired by those legends that were big in the mid-70s.
Would you guys consider your music Glam Rock then?
Yes, of course. We definitely would like to bring back all the glamour that was back in the 70s with our eccentric outfits and energetic music.
What separates your from the other bands emerging as of lately?
Well, we are a band who likes to have a laugh. We try not to take things too seriously. There are quite a few bands out there that are quite self-conscious when they go on stage, and we try not to submit to the same path as theirs. We strive to be entertaining and alive when it comes to performing live.
How’s Malaysia treating you guys so far?
Very good! The people have been pretty nice so far. We have never been to Malaysia before and we are liking what we see so far. And of course, the food is just gastronomic!
What was your initial reaction when MTV approached you to perform for MTV World Stage?
We were quite shocked, to be honest. I mean, we have toured with Pink before this, but that was it. We were surprised anyone would even take notice of us beyond that, let alone in Malaysia. But obviously, we jumped at the chance the second we were asked to perform at MTV World Stage.
What can the fans expect from you at the MTV World Stage concert?
Fans can definitely expect Raygun’s set to be an energetic one. There will be a lot of sweating going on, so I hope the fans brought spare change of clothes. Haha.
What do you expect from the fans in return?
Honestly, we are a little nervous performing tonight. This is our first time performing in Asia, and also Malaysia, so we’re not sure how the fans are going to react to our music. We do hope the crowd will not be too reserved, and will let loose and have fun with the music.
Tell us more about your hit single Just Because.
Just Because is a song about indulgence. Like how the chorus goes: “Just because you can, it doesn’t mean you should” – it is all about thinking first of your actions before you do them. A lot of people complain that it’s a song about drugs, but I beg to differ; it’s more of an anti-drug song, if you ask me. Just because you have the means to do all the wrong things in life, it does not mean you should.
Are you guys working on a new album in the meantime?
Yeah, we are in the works on putting a debut album together. Hopefully, it will be ready by the end of the year. It is going to be up tempo, like all the songs you can hear from our MySpace page. Like what The Adj here would say: it’s going to be the next Nevermind and Sergeant Pepper. Haha.

When I read Raygun’s bio release for MTV World Stage, my first thought was, “Sure or not?” It sounded like a very exaggerating piece with heightened flowery and too big promises for a band that has just started off.

They were described as “lead vox and sonic experimentation”, “war guitar and audio discovery” and “pace maker and heartbreaker”. And apparently they “summon up the razzle of New Wave and the dazzle of the Scissor Sisters’ disco, the filthiness of INXS, as well as the rock nous of a band long ready to start a revolution”, as they vow to “set a new blueprint for pop rock”, because they think other bands “don’t try hard enough to pump our blood, or move our feet”.

It was a pretty release set to impress, but it was very hard to buy it for me. I mean, words are just words, right?

In person, Ray Gun, The Adj, Sam Embery and Ben Lyonsmyth were generally nice fellows. Ray was pretty much the lead everyone expected, doing most of the talking and all. The Adj answered too, but eventually, you would catch on that they did not really apply unless for a laugh. Ben and Sam were pretty much just sitting there being pretty. Heh.

Overall, they were a nice band to interview, though it may probably be dued to the fact that they are new and in a foreign country, so they did not want to offend.

Tell us a bit about your band, Raygun.
Raygun is made up of me, Ray, the lead, along with guitarist The Adj, bassist Ben and drummer Sam. Adj and I have been a band of sorts for six years now since we were studying in London College of Music. Ben and Sam joined in later and the chemistry was right. Then, as everyone says, the rest is history.

What kind of music of you guys play?
We play a lot of 70s rock. Our influences are those such as David Bowie, T-Rex, Mick Jagger and Iggy Pop, so our music will mostly be inspired by those legends that were big in the mid-70s.

Would you guys consider your music Glam Rock then?
Yes, of course. We definitely would like to bring back all the glamour that was back in the 70s with our eccentric outfits and energetic music.

What separates your from the other bands emerging as of lately?
Well, we are a band who likes to have a laugh. We try not to take things too seriously. There are quite a few bands out there that are quite self-conscious when they go on stage, and we try not to submit to the same path as theirs. We strive to be entertaining and alive when it comes to performing live.

How’s Malaysia treating you guys so far?
Very good! The people have been pretty nice so far. We have never been to Malaysia before and we are liking what we see so far. And of course, the food is just gastronomic!

What was your initial reaction when MTV approached you to perform for MTV World Stage?
We were quite shocked, to be honest. I mean, we have toured with Pink before this, but that was it. We were surprised anyone would even take notice of us beyond that, let alone in Malaysia. But obviously, we jumped at the chance the second we were asked to perform at MTV World Stage.

What can the fans expect from you at the MTV World Stage concert?
Fans can definitely expect Raygun’s set to be an energetic one. There will be a lot of sweating going on, so I hope the fans brought spare change of clothes. Haha.

What do you expect from the fans in return?
Honestly, we are a little nervous performing tonight. This is our first time performing in Asia, and also Malaysia, so we’re not sure how the fans are going to react to our music. We do hope the crowd will not be too reserved, and will let loose and have fun with the music.

Tell us more about your hit single Just Because.
Just Because is a song about indulgence. Like how the chorus goes: “Just because you can, it doesn’t mean you should” – it is all about thinking first of your actions before you do them. A lot of people complain that it’s a song about drugs, but I beg to differ; it’s more of an anti-drug song, if you ask me. Just because you have the means to do all the wrong things in life, it does not mean you should.

Are you guys working on a new album in the meantime?
Yeah, we are in the works on putting a debut album together. Hopefully, it will be ready by the end of the year. It is going to be up tempo, like all the songs you can hear from our MySpace page. Like what The Adj here would say: it’s going to be the next Nevermind and Sergeant Pepper. Haha.

Here is Just Because.

The new blueprint of pop rock? You be the judge.

++
Also check out:
MTV World Stage : Interview with Stank
MTV World Stage “Live in Malaysia”
MTV World Stage : Backstage

MTV World Stage : Interview with Stank

August 20, 2009
Hoobastank has been around for about 15 years now. How do you think your music has changed over the years?
Dan: You know how you hang out with the same bunch of friends, and you cannot really tell what has changed because you see them every day. It is the same for us as a band; we see each other every day, and we cannot really tell the difference. I can say our music has progressed throughout the years, but to get a better opinion, you would need to ask the fans who watch us from the outside.
Throughout your career, was there ever a time when things got too hard and you want to just give up?
Chris: Not really. We enjoy what we are doing, so we are really excited about it to even think we should quit. The only time we thought if we should give up was before we were signed to a label. We were a band for about five years before that, and things got grim as the days passed by. We were beginning to contemplate if we should call it quits, and that was when our record company picked us up.
What do you think keeps a band together?
Chris: To me, being in a band is like being in a relationship. We have to want the same things out of life. Also, giving each other ample space to grow. And of course, most importantly, be humble.
Hoobastank’s music is all about self-motivations and lessons in life. What would you say is the most important life’s lesson you have learned?
Dan: The older I get, the more I learn that not everyone feels the same and go through the same emotions as you. Looking back now, I wish that I have done some things and faced a few problems differently.
Chris: As I grow older, I realised that less things matter. The more important things in life are things like family, health and music. We don’t need to fuss over smaller and more detailed things other than that.
In light of your recent album, For(n)ever, what would you do forever, and what would you never do?
Chris: I would forever do rock songs, and will never do country songs.
Dan: Actually, I wouldn’t mind doing country music. I mean, obviously not with these guys here, but someday, I do wish to write some country songs just for kicks.
The Reason has gotten tremendous approvals from fans worldwide. Why do you think it is so?
Dan: Our lead, Doug (Robb), writes a lot of his songs based on the relationships he has gone through, and The Reason is one of them. I guess, why it got so famous is because everyone, at one point or the other of their lives, can relate to it. Whether if it is with your boyfriend or girlfriend, your mom or dad, or your friends, it is one of those songs that generally click for everyone. Besides, it has a catchy beat!
OK, tell us something true: are you guys sick of The Reason yet?
Dan: Haha, no, I don’t think so. The Reason is one of the few more chill out songs for Hoobastank. It is probably the only time when we can stand still and perform instead of jumping around on stage like we would for the other songs. It’s also a nice feeling to listen to an entire arena of fans sing along to The Reason.
Chris: I mean, why wouldn’t we want it? It’s always good for a band to have such an influential song to our name.
Dan: It’s always a good thing to get airplay for the song on the radio. We didn’t expect it to get so big. It’s gotten bigger than the band, even.
Do you guys find it hard to live up to The Reason after that?
Chris: Well, we don’t really sit around and think of how we can keep producing songs as famous as The Reason. The song did wonderfully for Hoobastank, and it has brought us to renewed heights as a rock band. But it would be silly to mull on the fame of it; the only way is to look towards the future and do our best in producing subsequent albums.
Karaoke is a popular past time here in Asia. Which songs would you sing at a karaoke session?
Dan: I would definitely sing along to Sir Mix-a-lot’s Baby Got Back! Also, maybe a few hip hop and rap numbers like Dr Dre.
Do you guys have any guilty pleasure songs stored in your iPods?
Chris: I wouldn’t call them guilty pleasures because I think they are quite talented in their own leagues. I enjoy listening to Justin Timberlake, and I think Christina Aguilera has an awesome voice too.
What about songs out there that make you cringe?
Chris: Hmm, I would have to say songs that sound British but are sung by non-Brits. Yeah, that makes me cringe every time. It just shows that they’re trying too hard.
Dan: There are a few bands out there who dress up all flashy like those people back in the 60s and 70s. I mean, I’m alright with that; I have nothing against their fashion sense. But I guess, your music has to measure up as well. A lot of bands out there recently don’t seem to be real anymore in their music, and they seem to spend more time prepping their image with fancy clothes instead of focusing on getting their music right. I’m just not convinced when it comes to bands like that.
What made Hoobastank say yes to performing at MTV World Stage?
Dan: Well, it is a good opportunity to leave home and play with some other awesome bands in the line up! Why say no when you can say yes?
Compared to your last performance in Malaysia in 2004 and the MTV World Stage tonight, how differently would you guys say the performances would be to each other?
Dan: Hmm, the only difference would probably be me dropping 20 pounds since our last performance here, haha. What with all the jumping around onstage.
Chris: MTV World Stage is almost not like a real show, because we’ll only be doing about four songs out there. I don’t see it as raising the bar since the last performance, but we’ll still do as good as we do in full blown sets, and try to keep it as enjoyable as we can for the fans, of course.
No matter how long we have been on the road, and how tired we get till we just want to go back and laze around on the couch, when we get onstage it is a completely different thing. We just go on autopilot, and we’ll channel this live energy we have from within us and just rock it out.
Hoobastank consists of lead Doug Robb, guitarist Dan Estin, bassist Jesse Charland and drummer Chris Hesse.
Their latest album For(n)ever was released in January 2009 with notable songs like My Turn, The Letter and So Close, So Far.

It feels like another lifetime ago, when I would listen to albums after albums of rock music, shack up at a place of a friend I barely knew just so I can attend Hoobastank’s concert in 2004 (also finding ways to get rid of the cans of complimentary Coke upon entrance), jump till I sweat along to Crawling in the Dark and scream at the top of my lungs to Running Away and The Reason. Uh huh.

Fast forward five years later, and I got a call that I will be interviewing Dan Estrin, the guitarist, and Chris Hesse, the drummer. I spent the night downloading all their albums because I left the first two back in my hometown and the other two I did not bother to even check out, and spent the entire day before the interview blasting the music in the car and on the headphones.

And I noticed how cheesy Doug Robb’s lyrics were for the first time that day. But at least it was a nice blast to the past, when everything was just loud basses, screeching solos, cymbalic ratatats and all too obvious lyrics with no metaphors whatsoever.

Hoobastank has been around for about 15 years now. How do you think your music has changed over the years?
Dan:
You know how you hang out with the same bunch of friends, and you cannot really tell what has changed because you see them every day. It is the same for us as a band; we see each other every day, and we cannot really tell the difference. I can say our music has progressed throughout the years, but to get a better opinion, you would need to ask the fans who watch us from the outside.

Throughout your career, was there ever a time when things got too hard and you want to just give up?
Chris:
Not really. We enjoy what we are doing, so we are really excited about it to even think we should quit. The only time we thought if we should give up was before we were signed to a label. We were a band for about five years before that, and things got grim as the days passed by. We were beginning to contemplate if we should call it quits, and that was when our record company picked us up.

What do you think keeps a band together?
Chris:
To me, being in a band is like being in a relationship. We have to want the same things out of life. Also, giving each other ample space to grow. And of course, most importantly, be humble.

Hoobastank’s music is all about self-motivations and lessons in life. What would you say is the most important life’s lesson you have learned?
Dan:
The older I get, the more I learn that not everyone feels the same and go through the same emotions as you. Looking back now, I wish that I have done some things and faced a few problems differently.
Chris: As I grow older, I realised that less things matter. The more important things in life are things like family, health and music. We don’t need to fuss over smaller and more detailed things other than that.

In light of your recent album, For(n)ever, what would you do forever, and what would you never do?
Chris:
I would forever do rock songs, and will never do country songs.
Dan: Actually, I wouldn’t mind doing country music. I mean, obviously not with these guys here, but someday, I do wish to write some country songs just for kicks.

The Reason has gotten tremendous approvals from fans worldwide. Why do you think it is so?
Dan:
Doug writes a lot of his songs based on the relationships he has gone through, and The Reason is one of them. I guess, why it got so famous is because everyone, at one point or the other of their lives, can relate to it. Whether if it is with your boyfriend or girlfriend, your mom or dad, or your friends, it is one of those songs that generally click for everyone. Besides, it has a catchy beat!

OK, tell us something true: are you guys sick of The Reason yet?
Dan:
Haha, no, I don’t think so. The Reason is one of the few more chill out songs for Hoobastank. It is probably the only time when we can stand still and perform instead of jumping around on stage like we would for the other songs. It’s also a nice feeling to listen to an entire arena of fans sing along to The Reason.
Chris: I mean, why wouldn’t we want it? It’s always good for a band to have such an influential song to our name.
Dan: It’s always a good thing to get airplay for the song on the radio. We didn’t expect it to get so big. It’s gotten bigger than the band, even.

Do you guys find it hard to live up to The Reason after that?
Chris:
Well, we don’t really sit around and think of how we can keep producing songs as famous as The Reason. The song did wonderfully for Hoobastank, and it has brought us to renewed heights as a rock band. But it would be silly to mull on the fame of it; the only way is to look towards the future and do our best in producing subsequent albums.

Are there any songs out there that make you cringe?
Chris:
Hmm, I would have to say songs that sound British but are sung by non-Brits. Yeah, that makes me cringe every time. It just shows that they’re trying too hard.
Dan: There are a few bands out there who dress up all flashy like those people back in the 60s and 70s. I mean, I’m alright with that; I have nothing against their fashion sense. But I guess, your music has to measure up as well. A lot of bands out there recently don’t seem to be real anymore in their music, and they seem to spend more time prepping their image with fancy clothes instead of focusing on getting their music right. I’m just not convinced when it comes to bands like that.

What made Hoobastank say yes to performing at MTV World Stage?
Dan:
Well, it is a good opportunity to leave home and play with some other awesome bands in the line up! Why say no when you can say yes?

Compared to your last performance in Malaysia in 2004 and the MTV World Stage tonight, how differently would you guys say the performances would be to each other?
Dan:
Hmm, the only difference would probably be me dropping 20 pounds since our last performance here, haha. What with all the jumping around onstage.
Chris: MTV World Stage is almost not like a real show, because we’ll only be doing about four songs out there. I don’t see it as raising the bar since the last performance, but we’ll still do as good as we do in full blown sets, and try to keep it as enjoyable as we can for the fans, of course.
No matter how long we have been on the road, and how tired we get till we just want to go back and laze around on the couch, when we get onstage it is a completely different thing. We just go on autopilot, and we’ll channel this live energy we have from within us and just rock it out.

Here is The Letter, featuring Vanessa Amorosi, taken off their latest album, For(n)ever.

++
Also check out:
MTV World Stage “Live in Malaysia”
MTV World Stage : Backstage

Onward the Prospekt’s March.

March 25, 2009

Event: Coldplay live in concert
Date: March 23, 2009 (Monday)
Venue: Singapore Indoor Stadium, Singapore

Two things. One: Singapore has this eeriely perfect vibe going on, it gives me the creeps. Two: I have been having an upset tummy since last Friday so if I wrote out of line for this entry, blame the tummy.

On to more serious business. I did not receive any news that there was going to be a supporting act for Coldplay that night, and I was quite surprised to see Mercury Rev, an American psychedelic rock band probably as old as I am, warming up the stage with Jonathan Donahue’s strangely outrageous body antiques and their famous tracks like The Dark is Rising, Goddess on a Hiway and Holes. Not to be biased, but Mercury Rev did sound quite good live compared to their studio tracks. Alas, the sold out crowd of more than 10,000 was restless because they paid good money to see Coldplay. And when Donahue announced it was their last song, the crowd roared with applause, not because they loved the band that much, but because the minutes towards Coldplay were running out.

For the half hour leading up to their appearance, the crowd was teased with songs from all over, shooting nothing straight at the British rock band. There was even a thin black cloth let down on stage covering the entire set. And I was totally caught off guard when Blue Danube started trembling the inside of the stadium. I thought Live Nation had gone bonkers for playing a classical waltz piece, but enjoyed watching the crowd going at the clapping and conducting all the same. Then, as the last fortissimo notes blasted off the air and the lights suddenly went off and the crowd went crazy. I changed my mind; that was a fucking brilliant idea for an introduction.

Being in the industry for about 10 years and with four albums under their sleeves, Coldplay knows how to get the crowd going. They played all of their upbeat songs, leaving the more solemn ones from Parachutes in their grim hometown. They also made sure they hit all the popular tracks so the crowd of more than 10,000 could sing – or scream, more like it – along with them. There were Violet Hill, Clocks, In My Place, The Scientist, Fix You and of course, the song that started them all in the first place – Yellow.

I liked it also that they had spent time with the gimmicks on stage. Before that, all of the concerts I have been to, the backdrops were either bare or merely accompanied by timed LED screens. Coldplay took the time out to even change the backdrops: from the Viva La Vida album cover to the logo, even had a montage of them playing live there and then, and one of Japan during Lovers in Japan.

There were balls of projectors hung from the ceiling, screening mini shots of the big screen on stage. There were even giant yellow balloons let off from the ceiling and the crowd during Yellow, whereby half of it was made out of fans in their mid-30s and mid-40s, suddenly turned into little kids, hands reach up to the sky groping for the balloons. Those of us on the sides could only watch and pout as we could not have a bounce at the balls. Meh.

And I liked it when the confetti rained down on us – or more so, once again, at those in the centre – during Lovers in Japan. It was as if Japan was brought right into the stadium that night, and the confetti was like sakuras falling on us when the spring breeze blew past the garden of Eden. It was a beautiful sight.

I liked it that there was a bunch of crowd interaction going on. There were two runways on each side of the stage, where Chris Martin would often bounce – seriously – himself down to the sides, giving out high fives and waving hello’s.

The entire band squeezed themselves into a corner on the right runway, as they launched into a minoric medley of God Put a Smile Upon Your Face/Talk before Martin took over with his piano solo medley of The Hardest Part and Postcard from Far Away on his trustee sidekick of a piano. Then, before they went on a break, they high fived their way up to the left wing and stood amongst the crowd performing an acoustic version of Speed of Sound and a couple of cover tracks.

And I loved, loved, loved the Mexican phone wave during the break. Before the band ran off for a short break, Chris led us into a little activity, where very much like the Mexican wave, we would use the light on our cell phone screens to do the wave. I tell you, when they dimmed the lights and everyone was doing their part for the wave, it was pretty.

When Coldplay burst into the opening chords of Viva La Vida, it was as if the hefty lawsuit on plagiarism never happened at all. The fans did not care as they sang along to the bridge of wo-oh-oh-oh-ohhh… and very much still even after the concert and the crowd had spilled out of the stadium. And Coldplay certainly did not care; performing the song in front of a very satisfied 10,000+ crowd was like giving Joe Satriani a big fucking middle finger.

Chris Martin may be a crowd-pleaser for his fast  songs, but when he kicked up his tail coat and took charge of his piano for the slower songs, he was a heart wrecker. When he started the eerie opening of Fix You, the crowd went on another bout of screams while I stilled myself and listened to his words: “When you try your best but you don’t succeed / When you get what you want but not what you need / When you feel so tired that you can’t sleep / Stuck in reverse…”

Lovers around me looked at each other with a loving look before embracing and swaying to the song, and friends wrapped arms around one another as they sang along to the chorus of “Lights with guide you home / And ignite your bones / And I will try to fix you” . I was like a solo entity at that moment with goosebumps spreading on  my skin. When the band joined in for a powerful second half, I felt tears dwelling in my eyes as they crooned in unison: “Tears stream down your face / I promise you I will learn from my mistakes…” The organ that derived from a solitary church and the soothing words like a sinner’s peek into the Bible. I have always been one to put my life in the hands of a rock & roll band, and that night, Chris Martin had my entire life – body, heart and soul – in his hands.

The concert may have gone on for a mere two hours, but it felt like forever. Remember in my Jason Mraz concert review I said he was one who was conceived on stage, well, Coldplay is the one giving birth to Mraz. They made the stage. So what their gimmicks were already seen in some other parts of the world. So what their ending song was not that perfect – the confettious Lovers in Japan would have made a perfect finale compared to Life in Technicolor II, which should have just been done at their opening. So what Coldplay is facing plagiarism charges for Viva La Vida.

I am sorry Ben Gibbard. This is Death Cab‘s performance on top spot of my life. This is Coldplay giving a good kick on their behinds and taking over their spot there.

I asked my friend once how was her recent Coldplay concert in Australia and she said: “Do you even have to ask? They were like Gods!” And believe you me, they were.  They were.

PS: And yes, it sucks you could not be there. *laughs in your face*